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The Ohio County Times News
Hartford, Kentucky
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January 18, 1973     The Ohio County Times News
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January 18, 1973
 

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r .....................................................................  ............. ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ,.,,.o.,o ..__ 00oo.. TIMES HARTFORO, KENTOCKV. JANOARY 18, 1973 6 County Extension Agent O0000000 Agriculture OFFICE PHONE 298-5625 HOME PHONE 298-7125 John Kava,,augt, BEEF OUTLOOK FOR 1973 According to U. of K. College of Agriculture, Extension Economist, cattle prices should remain strong through the first half of 1973. Consumer demand for red meat is rising, with the demand for beef increasing faster than the demand for most other foods. Beef consumption has risen sharply in the past 20 years, and the trend is expected to continue. Per capita, beef consumption in the U.S. rose from 63 pounds in 1950 to 113 in 1971 and is estimated to be as high as 136 pounds by 1980. However, beef production continues to rise. Two million cattle were added in 1970, nearly 3.5 million in 1971 and more than 4.5 million in 1972. Sometine soon, probably this year or next, cattlemen will begin sending more cattle to market. The increase seems likely to be about 10 percent in the number of cattle slaughtered and in beef production. The last time beef output went up that much was in 1964. An increase of 10 percent, even if spread over a couple Marriage Licenses ,. Ronald Francis Clothier, 35, Beaver Dam, coal miner to Mattie Beatrice Daugherty, 25, Beaver Dam. of years, probably would stop the upward trend of cattle prices for two years or so. In fact, a decrease of 10 percent or more could easily occur. The supply of beef is not the only thing that will in- fluence the price of cattle dpring the next two or three years. Other inportant price-making factors in- clude the strength of con- sumer demand and the supply of competing meats. Consumer demand is ex- pected to be strong this year, maybe a little higher in 1974. The supplies of meats competitive with beef will be about the same in 1973 as in 1972, but they will in- crease in 1974 as a result of greater pork production. If the price of beef cattle trend downward during 1973 and 1974, the first and strongest pinch will be on feedlot operators. Later, the prices of feeder cattle would be reduced to offset the lower returns from fed cattle. Feeder calf prices moved up in 1972 until Oc- tober then declined, especially on light weight calves. These have in- creased in December and January to fall levels. Based on the outlook for fed cattle, the feeder calf market for the first six months of 1973 should remain firm or possibly show a seasonal rise 1972. * So it looks as ff the beef industry could be at a tur- ning point. But, who knows? NEWS from your PHARMACIST By Jim Aver i .: :; M any older persons are Mrs. Lewis Stokes Christian Mrs. Lanham hospitalized or lo n g periods of time each Four 4-H Alumni Winners year because they broke a bone in a fall. Bones in the elderly are usually brittle and even slight falls can sometimes break a hip or leg. This can lead to months and even years of incapacitation. The only way to avoid these injuries is to practice safety in, and away from, the home. Be careful when climbing or descending stairs. Watch for toys in the floor or small rocks in the yard. Either could cause you to turn an ankle and fall. Be especially careful when climbing into or out of a bathtub. This has been the scene of many accidents. Practicing safety always pays off. Our pharmacists compound every prescription with the utmost in care and accuracy. Your health is our number one concern. Allow us to fill your next prescription. From Kentucky Named Four Kentuckians have been honored for their commmunity leadership and continued service to the 4-H Club as state 4-H alumni recognition winners. Two of the winners, Mrs. Owen Lewis and Mr. Silas Stokes, Jr., are residents of Lexington in Fayette County. The other alumni winners are Mr. John Christian of Hopkinsville in Christian County and Mrs. Gene Lanham of Gravel Switch in Marion County. Each state winner has received a burnished copper plaque mounted on walnut. Olin Corporation donated the plaques. "I can emphatically state that 4-H Club work was the major influence on me in deciding where I would go to college and what my major would be," said Mrs. Lewis, who worked for five years for the Cooperative Extension Service. She won a five-month expense-paid 4- H trip to Europe as a junior at the University of Ken- tucky. Mr. Stokes owns two farms specializing in Shorthorn cattle breeding. He learned many of his progressive agricultural practices as a 4-H'er in the beef and sheep projects. He won a trip to the .National 4-H Congress for Champion Shorthorn Calf. Mr. Christian is currently minister of the Second Baptist Church in Hopkinsville, but he's King's Drugs preached at churches in Tennessee and Kentucky. "I give my 4-H work plenty of credit as builder of a sturdy character to withstand the tests of life," said Christian. He has served as a judge in 4-H contests and as Director of the American Red Cross. Mrs. Lanham worked in food and clothing projects as a 4-H'er and feels this has helped her "make a success out of being a homemaker and wife for my family." County Extension Agent Bernard Bourbeau said of Mrs. Lanham; "She has contributed greatly in strengtheningthe program in leadership areas and involving young people in opportunities of self- development. Parents Pitch There are other com- munities in Ohio County where a lot of action in 4-H is stirring in addition to the 231 4-H Club community. Some of these clubs have been in operation a little longer, but for some this is the second or third year. One such club is the Town 'n Country 4-H Club. The club has been organized since the fall of 1971 and has been active in most all 4-H activities: Variety Show, Talk Program, Demon- strations, Livestock Judging, 4-H Camp, 4-H Fair and County Fair, State Fair, projects and com- munity work. Recently the club organizational leaders set up various project meetings with parents of members in the club. The parents will work with the members on various projects coming up and have those completed by the time of the 4-H Fair in the spring. All projects do not have parents helping. Only certain ones were selected to concentrate on since several projects are conducted on a county-wide basis that are of particular interest to boys. A small engine project group will be set up later just prior to Hartford, Ky. spring, providing there is an Phone 298-3278 interested parent to help the / i Parents helping with the Otha Daniel's Bookmobile Schedule projects are: Clothing- Homemakers Mrs. Addis Stongh was hostess for the Otha Daniel Homemakers Club Christmas party. The house was beautifully decorated "for the occasion. Mrs. Charles Parrish conducted the brief business session. Mrs. E.L. Griffin gave the devotional and had charge of the Christmas program. There were 15 members and 2 visitors present. Gifts were exchanged by all and a bountiful Chirs er waslerved.: : , The club will et January 18 at the home of Mrs. Bural Rasse at 10 o'clock. Monday, Jan. 22 Centertown School, 8:45 to Pleasant Ridge School, 8:45 10:15 a.m.; Matanzas, 10:30 to10:15a.m.; Taffy, 10:35to to 11 a.m.; Centertown 11 a.m.; Jim's Grocery Bank, 11:15 to 11:40 a.m.; (Deanefield), 11:20 to 11:40 Middle School, 1:10 to 2:15 a.m.; Reynolds Station Post p.m.; Professional Care Office, 11:45 a.m. to 12:10 Home, 2:30 to 2:50 p.m.; Ohio County Hospital, 3 to p.m.; Bennetts (Beda), 3:15 p.m. 12:45 to 1.p.m.; Beda Craft Shop, 1:05 to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 24 Tuesday, Jan. 23 Fordsville School, 9 to 11:15 a.m.; Golden Years Rest Home, 11:20 to 11:40 a.m.; Fordsville Library, 12:30 to 4:15 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 25 Woosley's Store (Rosine), 8:45 to 9:15 a.m.; Horse Branch School, 9:30 to 11 a.m.; C. E. Barnes, 11:05 to 11:15 a.m.; Horse Branch Post Office, 11:20 to 11:40 a.m.; Landrum's Store Joyce Broyles; Home Furnishings-Patsy Whit- taker and Deloris Eskridge and Boys Foods-Ann (Horse Branch), 11:45 a.m. to 12:10 p.m.; Shains (Olaton), 12:45 to 1 p.m.; Nabours, 1:10 to 1:20 p.m.; McPhersons (Narrows Road), 1:40 to 1:55 p.m.; Muffetts, 2 to 2:15 p.m. Westerfield Tinsley. meetings starte Tuesday, Home 1 will begin MondaY, 29 and Boys FoodJ . Tuesday night, JJ Succeeding meetings will the Orff o f the Town Club are Fourqurean Leach. L Other Clubs FECl County who havel activity in 4-H community and t _ involved the youdG that club in l perience that provy development are Community, Beat Moo Cmmunity, PleA l Community, ' " Calamity and  or Da Community. _.m' r if you would 15" these type expeb,rgq the boys and girlA community, do [-" leaders have don, parents and peolA I community Yi,,, , L,i I$1OI surprised as to wn o. glad to help. All qlrl know is what, v I Roll otl m lid m B B .............. Mark Edward Givens, 19, Echols, coal miner to Cheryl Ann Thompson, 16, Echols. Gettie J. Morris, 24, Louisville, Gulf Service Station, to Rebecca Lynn Beck, 16, Cromwell. Russell Gene King, 19, Cromwell, student, to Bertha Monroe Sanders, 17, Rosine. Theodore Roosevelt Raven, Jr., 35, Beaver Dam, cook, to Judy Ann Dukes, 26, Centertown. James M. Gerteisen, 23, Madisonville, South Central Bell to Cheryl Kaye Elmore, 22, Beaver Dam. Robert F. Widner, 42, Beaver Dam, miner to Christine Williams, 38, Beaver Dam. Mark Lee Toomey, 18, Whitesville, service, to Helen Marie Moseley, 16, Utica. Rickie Burden, 19, Morgantown, roofer, to Deborah Lynn Hines, 16, Beaver Dam. Estill Lee Dockery, 21, Morgantown, R & M Lumber Co., to Dolores Faye Hines, 17, Beaver Dam. IDAHO BAKING POTATOES 10 lb.  89 APPLY NOW We Train Men to Work As LIVESTOCK BUYERS If you have some livestock experience we will train you to buy cattle, sheep and hogs. For a local interview, wr,te today with your background. include your complete ad- dress and phone number. CATTLE BUYERS, INC. 4420 Madison Kansas City, Mo. 641 ! I i'.;.;. ('.tilt ..d ,(;,,lor& ,,, THE EAGLES' SPORTSBOOSTER AT HOME OR AWAY STEREO FM 106.3 A SERVICE OF... Royal Crown Cola Bank of Dundee Gulf Oil Products The Hartford Bank & Trust Co. B & B Sporting Goods King Drugs Elaines' Ouality Furniture W.E. Drown Insurance Porter - Leach Hardware Schultz Mens & Boys Wear Rice Drugs Posey Shop Weedman Ford Majors Transit Spinks' Pharmacy Farm Bureau Insurance H & R Block COFFEE MATE 79' e,,ee ,,,,,oeO,..o,o,oo.,o STOKELY TOMATO CATSUP .......... ......... 21' VAN CAMP BEANIE WEEN EE ...... 2/49' SOFT AND DRI UNSCENTED 5 oz DEODORANT ........... . .... 93 PRICES GOOD JANUARY 18, 19, 20, 1973 Thelma's Rockport- 274-3871 WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES KELLY'S SLOPPY JOES oz. 39' h.,.,o.,..,.,,,,.oeoo ,,oeee VEG-ALL MIXED VEGETABLES 19' RED CROSS ELBO SPAGHETTI ..... !..oz.:.. 2/25 ' STOKELY APPLESAUCE ..!.'.....L. 19' PLATTER SLICED BACON ................... ...... i' FIELD'S ROLL CHILl ................................. !!! on,, RED ROME i  APPLES ...................... EMPEROR GRAPES ,b ; GOLDEN RIPE BANANAS ..................... VALU-MART COUPON i! 10 oz. INSTANT MAXWELL HOUSE cO 50' COUPON With Coupon 99' Reg. Price Without Coupon LI,f I ONE COUPON PER FAMIL Y ,, OFFER EXPIRES JArqLJARY Y0 1D/:.